Mastering Physics Solutions: Fat: The Fuel of Migrating Birds

Mastering Physics Solutions: Fat: The Fuel of Migrating Birds

On February 23, 2013, in Chapter 05: Work and Energy, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 455.165 km
Part B = 8.9523 g
Part C = 3.1107 g

Consider a bird that flies at an average speed of 10.7 m/s and releases energy from its body fat reserves at an average rate of 3.70 W (this rate represents the power consumption of the bird). Assume that the bird consumes 4g of fat to fly over a distance db without stopping for feeding. How far will the bird fly before feeding again?
How many grams of carbohydrate mcarb would the bird have to consume to travel the same distance db?
Field observations suggest that a migrating ruby-throated hummingbird can fly across the Gulf of Mexico on a nonstop flight traveling a distance of about 800 km. Assuming that the bird has an average speed of 40.0 km/hr and an average power consumption of 1.70 W, how many grams of fat does a ruby-throated hummingbird need to accomplish the nonstop flight across the Gulf of Mexico?

Click for More...

Tagged with:  

Mastering Physics Solutions: Exercise 17.44

Mastering Physics Solutions: Exercise 17.44

On April 21, 2012, in Chapter 17: Electric Current and Resistance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 82.62 dollars Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part B = 3.2 Ω Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem

On average, an electric water heater operates for 1.8 h each day.
If the cost of electricity is $0.34 kWh, what is the cost of operating the heater during a 30-day month?
What is the resistance of a typical water heater?

Click for More...

Tagged with:  

Mastering Physics Solutions: Resistance of a Heater

Mastering Physics Solutions: Resistance of a Heater

On April 14, 2012, in Chapter 17: Electric Current and Resistance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 12.5 A Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part B = 9.6 ohms Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part C = 16.1 minutes Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem

A 1500-W heater is designed to be plugged into a 120-V outlet.
What current will flow through the heating coil when the heater is plugged in?
What is R, the resistance of the heater?
How long does it take to raise the temperature of the air in a good-sized living room (3.00m x 5.00m x 8.00m) by 10.0°C?

Click for More...

Tagged with:  

Mastering Physics Solutions: Exercise 18.14

Mastering Physics Solutions: Exercise 18.14

On March 5, 2012, in Chapter 18: Basic Electric Circuits, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 5.3, 5.3, 11, 11 A Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part B = 11, 11, 21, 21 V Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part C = 550 W Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem

Suppose that the resistor arrangement in the figure is connected to a 21 V battery.
What will be the current in each resistor?
What will be the voltage drop across each resistor?
What will be the total power delivered?

Click for More...

Tagged with:  

Mastering Physics Solutions: Heating a Water Bath

Mastering Physics Solutions: Heating a Water Bath

On March 4, 2012, in Chapter 17: Electric Current and Resistance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 984 s Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem

In the circuit in the figure, a 20-ohm resistor sits inside 103 g of pure water that is surrounded by insulating Styrofoam.
If the water is initially at temperature 11.7 °C, how long will it take for its temperature to rise to 57.3 °C?16

Click for More...

Tagged with:  

Mastering Physics Solutions: Power Dissipation in Resistive Circuit Conceptual Question

Mastering Physics Solutions: Power Dissipation in Resistive Circuit Conceptual Question

On February 19, 2012, in Chapter 17: Electric Current and Resistance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 0.5P0
Part B = 2P0

A single resistor is wired to a battery as shown in the diagram below. (Intro 1 figure) Define the total power dissipated by this circuit as P0.

Now, a second identical resistor is wired in series with the first resistor as shown in the second diagram to the left (Intro 2 figure).
What is the power, in terms of P0, dissipated by this circuit?
The second resistor is now removed from the circuit and rewired in parallel with the original resistor as shown in the schematic to the left (Intro 3 figure)
What is the power, in terms of P0, dissipated by this circuit?

Click for More...

Tagged with: