Mastering Physics Solutions: Where’s the Energy?

Mastering Physics Solutions: Where’s the Energy?

On March 1, 2013, in Chapter 05: Work and Energy, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = smooth
Part B = a distance 2h/3 above the floor
Part C = -2mgh/3
Part D = -mgh
Part E = 1/2mvi^2 + mghi = 1/2mvf^2 + mghf
Part F = K increases; U decreases; E stays the same
Part G = sqrt(v^2 + 2gh)
Part H = 1/2mvi^2 + Wnc = 1/2mvf^2
Part I = K decreases; U stays the same; E decreases
Part J = friction
Part K = 0.5mv^2 + mgh

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Stopping the Proton

Mastering Physics Solutions: Stopping the Proton

On February 24, 2013, in Chapter 15: Electric Charge, Forces, and Fields, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 0.180 m Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem

An infinitely long line of charge has a linear charge density of 8.00*10^−12 C/m. A proton is at distance 19.0 cm from the line and is moving directly toward the line with speed 1200 m/s.
How close does the proton get to the line of charge?

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Shooting a Block up an Incline

Mastering Physics Solutions: Shooting a Block up an Incline

On February 23, 2013, in Chapter 05: Work and Energy, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = L = ((0.5 * xc^2 * k) – m * g * sin(θ) * xc) / (m * g * (sin(θ) + cos(θ)*μ))

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A block of mass m is placed in a smooth-bored spring gun at the bottom of the incline so that it compresses the spring by an amount xc. The spring has spring constant k. The incline makes an angle θ with the horizontal and the coefficient of kinetic friction between the block and the incline is μ. The block is released, exits the muzzle of the gun, and slides up an incline a total distance L.

Find L, the distance traveled along the incline by the block after it exits the gun. Ignore friction when the block is inside the gun. Also, assume that the uncompressed spring is just at the top of the gun (i.e., the block moves a distance xc while inside of the gun). Use g for the magnitude of acceleration due to gravity.

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Exercise 16.30 (Voltage Required to Accelerate a Beam of Protons)

Mastering Physics Solutions: Exercise 16.30 (Voltage Required to Accelerate a Beam of Protons)

On February 4, 2012, in Chapter 16: Electric Potential, Energy, and Capacitance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 3.3 V Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part B = 2.5 * 104 m/s Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part C = 3300 v Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part D = 8.0 * 105 m/s Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part E = 5.0 * 103 V Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part F = 9.8 * 105 m/s Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem

Calculate the voltage required to accelerate a beam of protons initially at rest if they have a kinetic energy of 3.3 eV.
Calculate their speed if they have a kinetic energy of 3.3 eV.

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Exercise 6.67

Mastering Physics Solutions: Exercise 6.67

On January 5, 2012, in Chapter 06: Linear Momentum and Collisions, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 0.10m Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem

A 1.0 kg object moving at 1.1 m/s collides elastically with a stationary 1.0 kg object, similar to the situation shown in the figure. How far will the initially stationary object travel along a 37° inclined plane? (Neglect friction.)

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Mastering Physics Solutions: A Relation Between Momentum and Kinetic Energy

Mastering Physics Solutions: A Relation Between Momentum and Kinetic Energy

On December 27, 2011, in Chapter 06: Linear Momentum and Collisions, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 0.550 Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part B = 0.742 Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem

A Relation Between Momentum and Kinetic Energy. A cardinal (Richmondena cardinalis) of mass 4.50×10−2 kg and a baseball of mass 0.149 kg have the same kinetic energy. What is the ratio of the cardinal’s magnitude pc of momentum to the magnitude pb of the baseball’s momentum? A man weighing 660 N and a woman weighing 490 N have the same momentum. What is the ratio of the man’s kinetic energy Km to that of the woman Kw?

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