Mastering Physics Solutions: Exercise 6.30

Mastering Physics Solutions: Exercise 6.30

On January 4, 2012, in Chapter 06: Linear Momentum and Collisions, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 230Ns Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part B = 780N Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part C = The other car exerts this force on the driver.

A 46 kg driver sits in her car waiting for the traffic light to change. Another car hits her from behind in a head-on, rear-end collision and her car suddenly receives an acceleration of 17 m/s2.
If all of this takes place in 0.30 s, what is the impulse on the driver?
What is the average force exerted on the driver?
What exerts this force?

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Impulse and Change in Velocity

Mastering Physics Solutions: Impulse and Change in Velocity

On December 28, 2011, in Chapter 06: Linear Momentum and Collisions, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = You will need a graph that passes through the following points: (0,0), (2.9,28), (3.1,28), and (6,0). Read more to see the solution.
Part B = The change in velocity of the superball is greater than the change in velocity of the clay.
Part C = The force exerted by the scale on the superball is greater than the force exerted by the scale on the clay.

A glob of very soft clay is dropped from above onto a digital scale. The clay sticks to the scale on impact. A graph of the clay’s velocity vs. time, Vclay(t), is given, with the upward direction defined as positive.
Sketch the graph of the superball’s velocity vs. time. Based on your graph, is the change in velocity of the superball during its collision with the scale greater than, less than, or equal to the change in velocity of the clay during its collision with the scale? Is the force exerted by the scale on the superball greater than, less than, or equal to the force exerted by the scale on the clay?

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Impulse on a Baseball

Mastering Physics Solutions: Impulse on a Baseball

On December 27, 2011, in Chapter 06: Linear Momentum and Collisions, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 8.4Ns Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part B = For this graph, the area of the rectangle corresponds to the impulse.
Part C = area
Part D = The impulse on the ball caused by the bat will be in the negative x direction.
Part E = -26m/s Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem

Impulse on a baseball. In Parts A, B, C consider the following situation. In a baseball game the batter swings and gets a good solid hit. His swing applies a force of 12,000 N to the ball for a time of 0.70×10-3m/s. Assuming that this force is constant, what is the magnitude J of the impulse on the ball?
The net force versus time graph has a rectangular shape. Often in physics geometric properties of graphs have physical meaning.
For this graph, the area of the rectangle corresponds to the impulse.
If both the graph representing the constant net force and the graph representing the variable net force represent the same impulse acting on the baseball, which geometric properties must the two graphs have in common?

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