Mastering Physics Solutions: An Electron in a Diode

Mastering Physics Solutions: An Electron in a Diode

On February 9, 2014, in Chapter 16: Electric Potential, Energy, and Capacitance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 9.16 * 10^6 m/s

Find its speed vfinal when it strikes the anode.

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Charge Distribution on a Conductor with a Cavity

Mastering Physics Solutions: Charge Distribution on a Conductor with a Cavity

On February 8, 2013, in Chapter 16: Electric Potential, Energy, and Capacitance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = Option 3

A positive charge is brought close to a fixed neutral conductor that has a cavity. The cavity is neutral; that is, there is no net charge inside the cavity.
Which of the figures best represents the charge distribution on the inner and outer walls of the conductor?

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Forces in a Three-Charge System

Mastering Physics Solutions: Forces in a Three-Charge System

On February 8, 2013, in Chapter 15: Electric Charge, Forces, and Fields, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = -2.87 * 10^-5 N Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem

Consider two point charges located on the x axis: one charge, q1 = -11.5 nC, is located at x1 = -1.685 m; the second charge, q2 = 40.0 nC, is at the origin (x = 0.0000).

What is the net force exerted by these two charges on a third charge q3 = 47.0 nC placed between q1 and q2 at x = -1.120 m?

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Question 17.6

Mastering Physics Solutions: Question 17.6

On February 15, 2012, in Chapter 17: Electric Current and Resistance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 84 J

To move 7.0 C of charge from one electrode to the other, a 12-V battery must do how much work?

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Mastering Physics Solutions: A Simple Network of Capacitors

Mastering Physics Solutions: A Simple Network of Capacitors

On February 14, 2012, in Chapter 16: Electric Potential, Energy, and Capacitance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 80.0 μC Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part B = 80.0 μC Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part B = 37.3 V Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem

In the figure are shown three capacitors with capacitances C1 = 6.00 μF, C2 = 3.00 μF, C3 = 5.00 μF. The capacitor network is connected to an applied potential Vab. After the charges on the capacitors have reached their final values, the charge Q2 on the second capacitor is 40.0 μC.
What is the charge Q1 on capacitor C1?
What is the charge on capacitor C3?
What is the applied voltage, Vab?

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