Mastering Physics Solutions: Geosynchronous Satellite

Mastering Physics Solutions: Geosynchronous Satellite

On October 4, 2013, in Chapter 07: Circular Motion and Gravitation, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 4.225 * 10^7

Find the radius R of the orbit of a geosynchronous satellite that circles the earth.

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Mass on Turntable

Mastering Physics Solutions: Mass on Turntable

On September 29, 2013, in Chapter 07: Circular Motion and Gravitation, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 0.34 m/s Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem

What is the maximum speed vmax that the cylinder can move along its circular path without slipping off the turntable?

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Whirling a Bucket

Mastering Physics Solutions: Whirling a Bucket

On May 21, 2013, in Chapter 07: Circular Motion and Gravitation, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 2.26 m/s
Part B = 3.28 m/s

A bucket of mass 1.80 kg is whirled in a vertical circle of radius 1.10 m. At the lowest point of its motion the tension in the rope supporting the bucket is 26.0 N.
Find the speed of the bucket.
How fast must the bucket move at the top of the circle so that the rope does not go slack?

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Circling Ball

Mastering Physics Solutions: Circling Ball

On March 1, 2013, in Chapter 07: Circular Motion and Gravitation, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 6mg

Find Tb – Tt, the difference between the magnitude of the tension in the string at the bottom relative to that at the top of the circle.

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Mastering Physics Solutions: A Conical Pendulum

Mastering Physics Solutions: A Conical Pendulum

On February 10, 2013, in Chapter 07: Circular Motion and Gravitation, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 3.21 N Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part B = 31.24 rpm Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem

A conical pendulum is formed by attaching a 0.300 kg ball to a 1.00 m-long string, then allowing the mass to move in a horizontal circle of radius 40.0 cm. The figure (Intro 1 figure) shows that the string traces out the surface of a cone, hence the name.

What is the tension in the string?
What is the ball’s angular velocity, in rpm?

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