Mastering Physics Solutions: Power Dissipation in Resistive Circuit Conceptual Question

Mastering Physics Solutions: Power Dissipation in Resistive Circuit Conceptual Question

On February 19, 2012, in Chapter 17: Electric Current and Resistance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 0.5P0
Part B = 2P0

A single resistor is wired to a battery as shown in the diagram below. (Intro 1 figure) Define the total power dissipated by this circuit as P0.

Now, a second identical resistor is wired in series with the first resistor as shown in the second diagram to the left (Intro 2 figure).
What is the power, in terms of P0, dissipated by this circuit?
The second resistor is now removed from the circuit and rewired in parallel with the original resistor as shown in the schematic to the left (Intro 3 figure)
What is the power, in terms of P0, dissipated by this circuit?

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Mastering Physics Solutions: A Stretchable Resistor

Mastering Physics Solutions: A Stretchable Resistor

On February 19, 2012, in Chapter 17: Electric Current and Resistance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 4R

A wire of length L and cross-sectional area A has resistance R.
What will be the resistance Rstretched of the wire if it is stretched to twice its original length? Assume that the density and resistivity of the material do not change when the wire is stretched.

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Resistance and Resistivity

Mastering Physics Solutions: Resistance and Resistivity

On February 17, 2012, in Chapter 17: Electric Current and Resistance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = length, cross sectional area, amount of electric current passing through them

At the same temperature, two wires made of pure copper have different resistances. The same voltage is applied at the ends of each wire. The wires may differ in

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Exercise 17.14

Mastering Physics Solutions: Exercise 17.14

On February 16, 2012, in Chapter 17: Electric Current and Resistance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 4.7 * 1016 protons/s Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part B = 1.7 * 105 J/s Ω Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part C = 330 ° per second Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem

In a proton linear accelerator, a 7.5 mA proton current hits a target.
How many protons hit the target each second?
How much energy is delivered to the target each second if each proton has a kinetic energy of 22 MeV and loses all its energy in the target?
If the target is a 1.30 kg block of copper, at what rate will its temperature increase if it is not cooled?
Express your answer as an integer.

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Exercise 17.4 (Voltage of a Battery in Series)

Mastering Physics Solutions: Exercise 17.4 (Voltage of a Battery in Series)

On February 16, 2012, in Chapter 17: Electric Current and Resistance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 10.0, 28.0 V

Assume all batteries are ideal unless told otherwise.
Given three batteries with voltages of 1.0 V, 8.0 V, and 19.0 V.
What are the minimum and maximum voltages that could be achieved by connecting them in series?

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Measuring the EMF and Internal Resistance of a Battery

Mastering Physics Solutions: Measuring the EMF and Internal Resistance of a Battery

On February 16, 2012, in Chapter 17: Electric Current and Resistance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 3.06 V Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part B = 3.636 * 10-2 Ω Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem
Part C = 1.82 Ω Click to use the calculator/solver for this part of the problem

When switch S in the figure is open, the voltmeter V of the battery reads 3.06 V. When the switch is closed, the voltmeter reading drops to 3.00 V, and the ammeter A reads 1.65 A. Assume that the two meters are ideal, so they do not affect the circuit.
Find the emf Ε.
Find the internal resistance r of the battery.
Find the circuit resistance R.

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