Mastering Physics Solutions: An Electron in a Diode

Mastering Physics Solutions: An Electron in a Diode

On February 9, 2014, in Chapter 16: Electric Potential, Energy, and Capacitance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = 9.16 * 10^6 m/s

Find its speed vfinal when it strikes the anode.

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Potential of a Charged Cylinder

Mastering Physics Solutions: Potential of a Charged Cylinder

On March 8, 2013, in Chapter 16: Electric Potential, Energy, and Capacitance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = V = 1/(2πε0h) * ln(h/(2r) + sqrt(1 + (h^2 / (4r^2)))
Part B = V0 = q / (4πε0r)

What is the electric potential V at the origin?
What is the potential V0 in the limit as h goes to zero?

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Potential of a Charged Disk

Mastering Physics Solutions: Potential of a Charged Disk

On March 6, 2013, in Chapter 16: Electric Potential, Energy, and Capacitance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = V(z) = 2kQ/a^2 * (sqrt(z^2 + a^2) – z)
Part B = E = 2kq/a^2 * (1 – (z)/sqrt(a^2 + z^2))

What is the electric potential V(z) on the z axis as a function of z, for z > 0?
What is the magnitude of the electric field E on the z axis, as a function of z, for z > 0?

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Force between Capacitor Plates

Mastering Physics Solutions: Force between Capacitor Plates

On March 2, 2013, in Chapter 16: Electric Potential, Energy, and Capacitance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = F(V) = 1/2 * Aε0(V^2 / d^2)

Find F(V), the magnitude of the force each plate experiences due to the other plate as a function of V, the potential drop across the capacitor.

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Electric Potential Ranking Task

Mastering Physics Solutions: Electric Potential Ranking Task

On February 10, 2013, in Chapter 16: Electric Potential, Energy, and Capacitance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = B > A > (C = D) > F > E

In the figure there are two point charges, +q and -q. There are also six positions, labeled A through F, at various distances from the two point charges. You will be asked about the electric potential at the different points (A through F).

Rank the locations A to F on the basis of the electric potential at each point. Rank positive electric potentials as larger than negative electric potentials.

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Mastering Physics Solutions: Charge Distribution on a Conductor with a Cavity

Mastering Physics Solutions: Charge Distribution on a Conductor with a Cavity

On February 8, 2013, in Chapter 16: Electric Potential, Energy, and Capacitance, by Mastering Physics Solutions

Part A = Option 3

A positive charge is brought close to a fixed neutral conductor that has a cavity. The cavity is neutral; that is, there is no net charge inside the cavity.
Which of the figures best represents the charge distribution on the inner and outer walls of the conductor?

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